Adopt an Agouti

Adopt an Agouti

Regular price
£65.00
Sale price
£65.00
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Agouti adoption comes with:

The fee for adopting an animal is based on a 3 month contribution to provide food, heating and enclosure maintenance, animal husbandry costs and veterinary fees for your favourite animals. You will also be assisting ongoing conservation projects at Exmoor Zoo.

You will receive

  • An adopters certificate
  • A complimentary zoo admission ticket for two people to visit the zoo (value £29.90 as of 2019)
  • A name plaque in our tunnel of fame for one year
  • A photograph of your favourite animal
  • Periodic zoo news updates

Any individual Zoo Animal can be adopted, but this is limited to 4 adoptions per year (one adoption per person for each 3 months of the year - maximum of 4 per year).

If this is a gift please note this in delivery instructions and use the delivery address to send the adoption package to.

Fact File:

The term agouti (Spanish: agutí, pronounced [aɣuˈti]) or common agouti designates several rodent species of the genus Dasyprocta. They are native to Middle America, northern and central South America, and the southern Lesser Antilles. Some species have also been introduced elsewhere in the West Indies. They are related to guinea pigs and look quite similar, but they are larger and have longer legs. The species vary considerably in colour, being brown, reddish, dull orange, greyish, or blackish, but typically with lighter underparts. Their bodies are covered with coarse hair, which is raised when alarmed. They weigh 2.4–6 kg (5.3–13.2 lb) and are 40.5–76 cm (15.9–29.9 in) in length, with short, hairless tails.

The related pacas were placed by some authorities in a genus called Agouti, though Cuniculus has priority and is the correct term.

In West Africa (especially Ivory Coast), the name "agouti" designates the greater cane rat which, while an agricultural pest, it is often sought as a bushmeat delicacy.

In Mexico, the agouti is called the sereque. In Panama, it is known as the ñeque and in eastern Ecuador, as the guatusa.