Adopt a Guinea Fowl for a Year

Adopt a Guinea Fowl for a Year

Regular price
£50.00
Sale price
£50.00
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Tax included.

Guinea Fowl adoption comes with:

The fee for adopting an animal is based on a 3 month contribution to provide food, heating and enclosure maintenance, animal husbandry costs and veterinary fees for your favourite animals. You will also be assisting ongoing conservation projects at Exmoor Zoo.

You will receive

  • An adopters certificate
  • A complimentary zoo admission ticket for two people to visit the zoo (value £29.90 as of 2019)
  • A name plaque in our tunnel of fame for one year
  • A photograph of your favourite animal
  • Periodic zoo news updates

Any individual Zoo Animal can be adopted, but this is limited to 4 adoptions per year (one adoption per person for each 3 months of the year - maximum of 4 per year).

If this is a gift please note this in delivery instructions and use the delivery address to send the adoption package to.

Fact File: 

Guineafowl (/ˈɡɪnifaʊl/; sometimes called "pet speckled hens" or "original fowl") are birds of the family Numididae in the order Galliformes. They are endemic to Africa and rank among the oldest of the gallinaceous birds. Phylogenetically, they branched off from the core Galliformes after the Cracidae (chachalacas, guans, and curassows) and before the Odontophoridae (New World quail). An Eocene fossil lineage Telecrex has been associated with guineafowl; Telecrex inhabited Mongolia, and may have given rise to the oldest of the true Phasianids, such as blood pheasants and eared pheasants, which evolved into high-altitude montane-adapted species with the rise of the Tibetan Plateau. While modern guineafowl species are endemic to Africa, the helmeted guineafowl has been introduced as a domesticated bird widely elsewhere.

The insect- and seed-eating, ground-nesting birds of this family resemble partridges, but with featherless heads, though both members of the genus Guttera have a distinctive black crest, and the vulturine guineafowl has a downy brown patch on the nape. Most species of guineafowl have a dark grey or blackish plumage with dense white spots, but both members of the genus Agelastes lack the spots. While several species are relatively well known, the plumed guineafowl and the two members of the genus Agelastes remain relatively poorly known. These large birds measure from 40–71 cm (16–28 inches) in length, and weigh 700–1600 grams or 1.5-3.5 pounds. Guinea hens weigh more than guinea cocks, possibly because of the larger reproductive organs in the female compared to the male guinea fowl. Also, the presence of relatively larger egg clusters in the dual purpose guinea hens may be a factor that contributes to the higher body weight of the guinea hens.